Identification and comparison of modern and fossil crocodilian eggs and eggshell structures.

Marzola M., Russo J., & Mateus O. (2014). Identification and comparison of modern and fossil crocodilian eggs and eggshell structures. Historical Biology, ahead-of-print, 1-19.
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08912963.2013.871009#.UxBg9vmB3MK

Identification and comparison of modern and fossil crocodilian eggs and eggshell structures.

The eggs of three modern crocodilian species, the Philippine Crocodile, Cuvier’s Smooth-fronted Caiman or Musky Caiman, and American Alligator or Common Alligator, were examined in detail to gain a better understanding of anatomy and microstructure to improve identification. The observations began with the ornamentation of the outer surface and continued to the microscopic structure of the eggshell. This led to interesting patterns from current to fossil Crocodylomorpha eggs since the Jurassic period and identification of a previously unknown egg ornamentation, the rugosocavate type. One shared characteristic between crocodiles and some groups of dinosaurs and birds is the pore system, called angusticaniculate, made of straight and subcircular pores.

The Dominant Dinosaur of Northeast Italy Appears Not to be the Same as the Rest of Europe

Marzola M., & Dalla Vecchia F.M. (2014). New dinosaur tracks from the Dolomia Principale (Upper Triassic) of the Carnic Prealps (Friuli-Venezia Giulia, NE Italy). Bollettino della Società Paleontologica Italiana, 53, i-xviii. http://paleoitalia.org/archives/published-online/

New dinosaur tracks from the Dolomia Principale (Upper Triassic) of the Carnic Prealps (Friuli-Venezia Giulia, NE Italy)

In the past 15 years, ten large rocks have been discovered that contain footprints in northeast Italy. Researchers in this study identified these as being from the late Triassic period between 200 and 220 million years ago by studying the rocks in the area. By studying the size and anatomy of these new tracks, scientists attribute these to Anchisauripus, a three-toed dinosaur that walked upon the toes of its two feet. However, these dinosaurs are not the most common European skeletal remains of the period and may have been the dominant trackmakers in the tidal flats of northeast Italy during the period.

Marco Marzola